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Curcuma

Typical of the Curcuma plant is that it gives you so much and asks for so little. It prefers a light, sunny location on the window sill but can also be kept in a sun lounge or on a balcony where the temperature will not drop below. Water your Curcuma twice a week, and add a little liquid plant food to the water once every two weeks. A Curcuma can produce 2 to 5 new flowers, each of which lasts for about 3 weeks.

If you follow these care tips, you can get even more enjoyment from your Curcuma.

Origins
Our Curcuma has its origins in India, Malaysia and Thailand where this beautiful plant is also known as the Siamese Tulip.  There, in the Far East, the Curcuma has enjoyed a strong reputation for centuries. It plays an important part in ancient Indian medicine as an Ayurvedic medicinal herb, and its slender yet impressive leaves and flower stems give people a pleasant feeling. For many artists, the intense yellow-orange, earthy colour of turmeric has been a perpetual source of inspiration.

Curcuma (Ginger)
Curcumas are the unimaginable world of hidden gingers, which get its name from some of the varieties because they bare there flowers on short stalks amid its foliage. Foliage is lush, broad and sometimes pleated. Curcumas love filtered light or light shade and enjoy moist soil. Blooms appear spring, summer or fall depending on variety. They should be fed with a good application of fertilizer in early spring to produce an exciting and unusual flower that can be enjoyed for weeks. All varieties listed are very hardy, but go dormant for the winter where they will die down to rest. Keep on the dry side while resting for the winter.

HEALTH – TO CURE IN THE FUTURE
Turmeric is the yellow-orange powder made from the ground root of a specially cultivated variety of Curcuma plant. The strongest active ingredient in the root of the Curcuma plant is curcumine. Turmeric is a standard ingredient in Indian curries and perhaps even the most therapeutic herb in Asian cuisine. Just remember that the plant is called Curcuma, the herb is called turmeric, and the active ingredient in the herb is curcumine.

HEALING POWER
Turmeric is the yellow-orange powder made from the ground root of a specially cultivated variety of Curcuma plant. The strongest active ingredient in the root of the Curcuma plant is curcumine. Turmeric is a standard ingredient in Indian curries and perhaps even the most therapeutic herb in Asian cuisine. Just remember that the plant is called Curcuma, the herb is called turmeric, and the active ingredient in the herb is curcumine.

HEALTHY CELL NUCLEI
Curcumine is an anti-oxidant (a substance that protects cells from becoming damaged) that is even more effective at this than vitamin E. Curcumine reduces inflammatory reactions because it is directly involved in various processes that make and keep the cell nucleus healthy. Curcumine’s most unique characteristic is that it appears to slow the growth of tumour cells and even to be able to kill them.

FOR YOUR HEALTH
Curcumine has a cleansing, healing effect on the entire body and contributes to a healthy, responsible lifestyle that includes sufficient exercise, healthy food and attention to wellness. Consuming curcumine can lower cholesterol levels and reduce obesity. A paste made from the root is used for skin diseases.

CURCUMINE: A NATURAL AND VERSATILE REMEDY
The active ingredient – curcumine – promotes healthy digestion and is a healing herb for the liver, spleen, stomach, intestines, lungs and blood. It has cancer-fighting, anti-inflammatory properties and can fight, slow down and even kill tumour cells. Curcumine is one of the most versatile natural medicines and one of the most important medicines in the Indian and Chinese medical traditions. It is the most important medicine in the practice of ancient Indian Ayurvedic medicine! Curcumine: a super herb for health.

RESEARCH IN AMERICA AND JAPAN
Scientists have found promising indications for the possible effectiveness of curcumine in preventing and curing Alzheimer’s disease (a disease not frequently occurring in India) and cancer. Researchers in the U.S. (UCLA and Harvard) and in Japan who have studied Alzheimer’s disease in mice report that animals who have received curcumine (a quarter teaspoon per day) developed 80% less amyloid protein plaque than do mice on a standard diet. This research has yet to be conducted on humans.

RESEARCH IN EUROPE
In 2010, the AMC (the Academic Medical Center affiliated with the University of Amsterdam) started two studies into the effectiveness of curcumine in anti-cancer treatments.
1. Cell therapy and curcumine conducted by the Gastrointestinal Department

The first study examined how curcumine could be used to enhance dendritic cell therapy in patients with oesophageal cancer. To date, few patients with oesophageal cancer are being cured.
Dendritic cell therapy is a relatively new method used to stimulate the immune system of a cancer patient in such a way that the body’s natural immune system again recognises and kills cancer cells. Curcumine’s characteristic of strengthening the immune system is expected to reinforce the beneficial effect of cell therapy.
2. Photodynamic therapy and curcumine conducted by the Experimental Surgery Department

The second study involves the effect of curcumine in combination with photodynamic therapy. This is a cancer treatment that uses visible laser light and a substance that makes cancer cells so vulnerable to it that they die.
The objective of these studies is to make cancer treatments more effective while keeping them less damaging for the patient and giving them a better quality of life. The difficulty in this kind of scientific research is to have the effective substance do its work in fighting the tumour in the right place.
These studies are being funded by the Stichting Nationaal Fonds tegen Kanker. This Dutch foundation committed to fighting cancer also receives contributions made on behalf of the consumer by the growers for every Curcuma-plant they sell. (For more information: ww.amc.nl and www.tegenkanker.nl
 

Care instructions

Put in a little and get back a lot!

THE LOCATION
The Curcuma prefers a light, sunny location – on a window sill, for example. A spot directly over the radiator is no problem. At a minimum temperature of 15° C, you can also put your Curcuma outside on the balcony or in the sun lounge, but just be sure that no water settles in the cavities formed by the bracts since the Curcuma cannot tolerate this. And avoid a draughty place, too: no plant tolerates this condition.

WATER
Watering your Curcuma twice a week – Monday and Thursday, for example – is usually enough. During watering, it would be handy to place a saucer under the pot so that the plant can absorb the optimal quantity of water. If the soil in the pot is still moist, no watering is needed. If your Curcuma gets brown leaf tips, this is a sign that the soil is too dry.

NUTRIENTS
When you purchase it, your Curcuma is planted in first-quality soil. Nevertheless, to keep your plant healthy and beautiful, it would be a good idea to add a little plant food once every two weeks to the water you give the plant.

THE FLOWERS
When receiving sufficient light, water and nutrients, a flower will remain in bloom for about 3 weeks. Once the flower has faded, cut the flower stem as close to the soil level as possible so that the plant can devote all of its energy to a new flower. A Curcuma plant can produce 2 to 5 new flowers so that you can enjoy it for a long time.

Your decorative Curcuma plant is not suitable for consumption. Turmeric used in cooking is produced only in specially cultivated Curcuma varietie

Light:
High light, but no direct sunlight
Temperature:
Medium, 15-19 °C
Water:
High, 1/2 cup twice a week, keep soil constantly moist